Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 month ago

Do British people see this man as a national hero?

9 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    Some do, in Northern Ireland and the west of Scotland! But in England and Wales......not really!

    King James II a Catholic king presiding over largely Protestant country was always going to be tricky which is why he only lasted three years! And in those tumultuous times Religion mattered more than anything!

    Anti catholic riots in England and Scotland at the time made his removal a priority if they were to avoid another civil war, which is why the British political class approached William of Orange to take the throne!

    To me the Stewart’s were a bad lot from beginning to end, a bunch of prize dandy’s who thought they were answerable to no one!!!

    The Plantagenets....they were the real men of action, with the exception of Henry VI who was maaad!

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  • F
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Only in Nothern Ireland.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Nope.

    Arthur

    Robin Hood

    Alfred the Great

    Hereward the Wake

    Brunel

    and

    Oliver Cromwell (included for triggering purposes)

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    What would you do without Wikipedia? 

    Only morons get their information from sources like Wikipedia. Read some real books. Then you might learn something. 

    And these stupid polls are a meaningless waste of time. There are 65 million Britons. Are you planning to ask all of them? 

    Go play your video games. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Most British people have never heard of him. Of those that have, rather less than half can date him to within fifty years.

    He was a compromise king (actually joint monarch with his wife, Mary, who was also his cousin). His predecessor, James II, had committed the most unforgiveable crime imaginable - that of becoming a Catholic. James would've been less hated if he'd committed mass murder. Yes, I know this sounds weird in the twenty-first century, but religion was considered important back then.

    Anyway, the religious wars of Europe were still within living memory, which frightened the powers that be, so they cast around for a suitably Protestant replacement. They settled on James' daughter and his son-in-law, William of Orange. Cue the Glorious Revolution.

    Hero or villain? Neither, really. Britain had passed the point where kings were expected to do any actual ruling (James II never got his head around this concept, which was another reason he had to go). Yes, things happened in William's name - including wars - but that was just a polite fiction. And yes, James II declined to go quietly, and stirred up trouble in (Catholic) Ireland which had to be dealt with.

    By and large, however, William and Mary were what Britain needed, in that they were uncontroversial and rather boring. Their only real failure was not producing an heir, meaning that William was succeeded by his sister-in-law (and cousin - she was James' other daughter) Anne, who went on to star in The Favourite.

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  • Nick
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Not particularly. He was a better king than James the 5hit, but because William and Mary didn't have any children England ended up under German rule 20 years later

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Honestly most people are hard pressed to remember that there was more than one William.  William III's actions took place outside of England.  Within England, which is the bigger part of the UK, he didn't leave much of a mark,* so people don't think about him at all.  Irish history is not well covered in the English curriculum.  Most people might vaguely lump him in with Cromwell as having "done stuff" in Ulster.  He's more significant to Scottish history as a deeply divisive figure who was part of "the wrong line of succession."  All that Orange Day stuff that goes on in Northern Ireland is completely alien to England.  There's a smattering of it in Scotland but it's not mainstream and mostly confined to the SW these days.

    *Actually, parliament gained ascendency over the monarchy during his reign which is a really important legacy and William III secured religious toleration for most Protestant sects, though he didn't get the Catholic toleration he wanted to implement through parliament.  He ought to be remembered for these things but since they're peaceable and not exciting he's not. 

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    • Moriarty
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      No Spidey, this answer is correct. Not just Anglicans (as William was not one himself) but he gave royal assent to The Toleration Act (1689) that granted freedom of worship to all dissenting Protestants, which finally abandoned a "comprehensive" Church of England.

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  • 1 month ago

    He clearly gives *you* trouser cramps, you loonie.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Ask this in the History or Royalty category.

    • Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Love to never get answers only smart asses.

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