Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 2 months ago

Cutting dogs nails little by little?

I have a extra large breed he HATES his nails cut and we have been trying to warm him up to it. We usually just end up taking him to the vet to have them do it under sedation. Unfortunately during his last blood work last month we found out that his liver enzymes are high so vet won't do his nails under sedation anymore which usually has to be done every 2-3 months. The local groomer refuses to do his nails after he nipped her about 10 months ago for just touching his feet which is why we started having the vet do them. So we are now doing his nails ourselves. He HATES the clippers and goes into a panic attack when he sees them so we talked with the local groomer and vet to get tips and advice. They both recommended that we use a Dremel made for dogs. So far it is going great he is still a little scared of his nails after using it for 3 weeks being done but he is fine as long as we only do a little on each nail (basically 5-6 seconds a nail) and give him a break and lots of treats. So my question is with us doing a little on his nails each week how long do you think it will take before his nails are back to being short again? He has 2 on each toe that are very long the rest seem to stay short for the most part. We don't want to stress him more than necessary because we know the prior owner never groomed him and only did minimal training. He was basically tossed outside in a pen 24/7. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Wait until he's asleep. That's how I clip my cat's nails. Even if you only get one done before he wakes up, you can always do the next one when he falls asleep again. Keep going like that until you get them all. Sometimes I can do an entire paw before my cat wakes up & bites me.

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  • 2 months ago

    i would just let a groomer do his nails

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Our dog Bear was much the same, he even managed to express his answer glands when fighting the vet to be put under sedation.

    We found that stuffing his dinner kibble and some small biscuits one by one while working eith his feet were the solution to the end of. Fighting him during this.

    We started with training him by touching the drummer to hie feet while it was capped but on, letting him feel the vibration.  At first he went into fight or flight like your dog.  Total panic.  His first owners never trimmed his nails, they waited for them to break off.  When we got him from the shelter he came with a two year free nail trimming.  We didn’t understand how bad it would be trying to trim his nails.  When we tried that first time he turned into a cross between Coujo and a wild dog, thrashing and fighting growling and snapping.

    After we worked with Bear for six months we finally were able to grind one paw a day, four days in a row.  We would feed him kibble (his dinner) as well as a handful of dry biscuits.  We gave him lots of hugs, pets, rubs while the other person ground his nails one at a time.

    Bear never got good at having his feet done but as long as we were stuffing food in him he was quite content and even held his paw up for us.  Problem was his nails were so tough the most we could do is one paw plus the dew claw per meal.  We. Di3nt want to over feed him and he was delighted having the attention of being hand fed his dinner so he didn’t mind us messing with his feet (after his training we wouldn’t punch or cut his toes till they bled)

    If your consistent with working with your dog, make it positive and get him set up for when you actually trim him, he will be more used to the ides and accepting of it.  While they never learn to like it, they can learn to accept it, and they figure out their feet don’t hurt when their nails are kept short.

    Good luck.

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  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Honestly, it's hard to know when bits of a job are done at a time and during the gaps the nails continue to grow. It's like cutting hair, but doing bits at a time, and waiting in-between. It can become a forever process.

    Dogs react similar to people in something like this. For a dog, nails cut too short hit a blood vessel and are painful. When not cut and not worn down by natural actions on rough surfaces, long nails can also grow badly and painful.

    There are no perfect solutions to this. You might play a bit of a game taking out the tool, not even cutting, but showing affection and a little treat.  Your dog has to lose his fear of the cutter and its process, and be very cautious not to cut too deeply.

    With enough positive reinforcement he can get over it, but it is like dealing with a child afraid of the dark. You need patience and extra attention.

    It's easier with two people. One to keep his attention and one to do the cutting.

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  • 2 months ago

    Do it all at once so that you are not constantly doing it to him. He would much rather have it done less often. Try wrapping a towel around his head when you do it. Make sure he can still breathe.

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  • oikoσ
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Sounds as if you have things worked out and under control. No dog likes to have his nails trimmed but some can tolerate it and some realize that they can escape unless properly restrained. I have one that I have to do one or two feet at a time before he bolts.

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