was britain always a multicultural place as much as now?

i was born in the 70's, i'm generation x and male and even in the scale of history since i was born, i don't recall britain being as multicultural in the past as it is now?

towns and cities have been transformed due to very high levels of immigration...now britain seems very 'non white'? was it like this decades back as much as it is now or has mass immigration changed britain significantly?

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  • Biff
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Get out of Manchester now and again. You get an unbalanced view staying in your high immigrant area all the time. Travel out to Saddleworth (nice place, I lived there once) and get some fresh air.

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It was less multicultural before England colonised other countries

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  • 2 months ago

    There have been plenty of immigrants in the British Isles over the centuries: Vikings, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, etc.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes, it is more multi-cultural,  but the country is still  80% white. Where I live  it probably at least 90% white if not higher.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes, 2 recent examples being;

    1) Due to the historical relations between the two countries, immigration to the UK from the region which is now Pakistan began in small numbers in the mid-19th century. During the mid-nineteenth century, parts of what is now Pakistan came under the British Raj and people from those regions served as soldiers in the British Indian Army, and some were deployed in other parts of the British Empire. However, it was following the Second World War, the break-up of the British Empire and the independence of Pakistan, that Pakistani immigration to the United Kingdom increased, especially during the 1950s and 1960s. This was made easier as Pakistan was a member of the Commonwealth.Pakistani immigrants helped to resolve labour shortages in the British steel, textile and engineering industries. Doctors from Pakistan were recruited by the National Health Servicein the 1960s.

    2) The Windrush generation in the UK. After World War II, many African-Caribbean people migrated to North America and Europe, especially to the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, France, and the Netherlands. As a result of the losses during the war, the British government began to encourage mass immigration from the countries of the British Empire and Commonwealth to fill shortages in the labour market. The British Nationality Act 1948 gave Citizenship of the UK and Colonies to all people living in the United Kingdom and its colonies, and the right of entry and settlement in the UK. Many West Indians were attracted by better prospects in what was often referred to as the mother country. 

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